Art Law Report

Conference in Cambridge—“From Refugees to Restitution: The History of Nazi Looted Art in the UK in Transnational Perspective”

Posted by Nicholas O'Donnell on January 31, 2017 at 10:55 AM

I am speaking at a conference on March 23-24, 2017 at the University of Cambridge (UK) entitled “From Refugees to Restitution: The History of Nazi Looted Art in the UK in Transnational Perspective.”  My presentation will address the various national panels created in response to the Washington Conference by European countries to address claims for Nazi-looted art in state collections.  The roster of speakers is impressive (present company excluded), and it promises to be a fascinating two days.  The program is available here, and the conference website is here

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Topics: Events, Victoria Louise Steinwachs, Debbie De Girolamo, Sotheby's, Tabitha I. Oost, Evelien Campfens, Leiden University, Bianca Gaudenzi, Emily Löffler, Landesmuseum Mainz, Michaela Sidenberg, Jewish Museum Prague, Mary Kate Cleary, Art Recovery Group, Robert Holzbauer, Leopold Museum, Tessa Rosebrock, Staatliche Kunsthalle, Karlsruhe, Laurel Zuckerman, Shlomit Steinberg, Emmanuelle Polack, Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art, Paris, London, Richard Aronowitz-Mercer, Fluchtgut, Maike Brueggen, Nathalie Neumann, Diana Kostyrko, Simone Gigliotti, Royal Holloway University of London, Elizabeth Campbell, University of Denver, Anne O. Popham, Marc Masurovsky, Holocaust Art Restitution Project, Angelina Giovani, Jewish Claims Conference, Ulrike Schmiegelt-Rietig, Wiesbaden, Jennifer Gramer, Agata Wolska, Nicholas M. O'Donnell, Johannes Nathan, Nathan Fine Art GmbH, Potsdam, Friederike Schwelle, Art Loss Register, Isabel von Klitzing, Provenance Research & Art Consulting, Frankfurt, Pierre Valentin, Constantine Cannon LLP

Museums in Bamberg and Karlsruhe Recognize a Sale Under Duress For What it Was, Seek to Do Right Thing

Posted by Nicholas O'Donnell on October 30, 2014 at 8:16 AM

Restitution policy at the federal and state level in Germany in recent months seems to have taken a certain direction that has been cause for criticism. Whether it is the recent decisions by the Limbach Commission that ignore longstanding law about sales under duress, the odd decision by the Federal Republic of Germany to resist a lawsuit over the Max Liebermann painting found in Cornelius Gurlitt’s apartment that the Gurlitt Task Force has already recommended be restituted, or the resistance to the claims by the Mendelssohn-Bartholdy heirs to Picasso’s Madame Soler, the trend has been towards obstruction and resistance rather than transparency and reconciliation. Notwithstanding the recent announcement of the Center for Cultural Property losses (the Deutsches Zentrum für Kulturgutverluste about which the jury is still out), this is cause for concern.

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Topics: Katharina Siefert, Schwabinger Kunstfund, Cornelius Gurlitt, Karlsruhe Kunsthalle, Freien Kunst- und Ritterschießen, Badische Landesmuseum, Max Liebermann, Bamberg, Gurlitt Collection, Woman in a Theatre Balcony, Lothar Franz von Schönborn, Madame Soler, Schönborn’sche Löwenpokal, Heinrich and Emma Budge, Reich Ministry for Art- and Museum Objects, Schönborn Lion Cup, Restitution, Upper Franconia, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Free and Knightly Art of Shooting, World War II, Elector-Bishop, Kurfürst, Reichserziehungsministerium für Kunst- und Museums, Kurt Martin, www.lostart.de, Center for Cultural Property, Museums, Fürst-Bischof, Picasso, Federal Republic of Germany, Deutsches Zentrum für Kulturgutverluste, Limbach Commission, Oberfranken, Prince-Elector of Mainz

Hans Sachs Collection Epilogue: Posters to Go on Sale in New York at Guernsey’s

Posted by Nicholas O'Donnell on November 5, 2012 at 4:02 AM

The Hans Sachs collection that the Bundesgerichtshof in Karlsruhe ordered in March be returned to the Sachs heirs will be put up for auction in New York. The collection had more than 12,000 posters by artist that included Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Ludwig Hohlwein, Lucian Bernhard and Jules Cheret. The Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin, a museum of German history, held for several decades parts of a poster collection was seized from Sachs in 1938. After his arrest and incarceration, Sachs fled the country with his family.

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Topics: Berlin, Jules Cheret, Lucian Bernhard, Guernsey’s Auctioneers & Brokers, Catherine Hickley, Hans Sachs, Bloomberg, Bundesgerichtshof, Ludwig Hohlwein, Restitution, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Karlsruhe, World War II, Arlan Ettinger, Deutsches Historisches Museum, New York

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